hepatitis

by Robert S. Brown, Jr, MD, MPH
Frank Cardile Professor of Medicine
Chief Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Robert S. Brown, Jr., MD, MPH

Robert S. Brown, Jr., MD, MPH

Common Liver Diseases and Transplantation, an Algorithmic Approach to Work-Up and Management is now available to gastroenterologists, internists, and students of gastroenterology, hepatology, and surgery.

Edited by Robert S. Brown, Jr, MD, MPH, Chief of the Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, this book presents a way for physicians to think about liver problems.

Chapters include:

    • Evaluation and management of early liver disease
    • Advanced liver disease/cirrhosis
    • Hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma
    • Evaluation of transplant candidates
    • Long-term management of liver transplant recipients
    • Hepatitis B virus
    • Hepatitis C virus
    • Alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
    • Autoimmune and cholestatic disease
    • Inherited metabolic liver disease

Each chapter includes an algorithm that allows physicians to efficiently diagnose and determine correct treatments for common liver problems.

According to Sanjiv Chopra, MBBS, MACP, Professor of Medicine and Faculty Dean for Continuing Education at Harvard Medical School, “We all have our textbooks, online resources, and other ways we choose to get clinical information. Common Liver Diseases and Transplantation will be the way many of us will choose to learn and adopt new algorithms in liver disease. I suspect Dr. Brown’s algoriths will be used for teaching many physicians.”

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More than 3 million Americans suffer from chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus. Often considered a “silent killer, ” an infected individual may go for years without symptoms before liver damage even becomes apparent. As the disease progresses, it can cause long-term damage to the liver and may lead to liver dysfunction or failure. Cirrhosis, or end-stage liver disease, caused by the chronic hepatitis C infection, is currently the leading indication of the liver transplants in the United States.

Elizabeth Verna, MD, MS

Elizabeth Verna, MD, MS

Recently, the development of new drugs for hepatitis C has changed the management of liver transplant patients. Two newly approved medications are now being combined with traditional treatments to form a powerful new drug cocktail, improving the outcomes among patients with this challenging disease. The new cocktail, part of the arsenal of treatment at the Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation, adds the newly approved drugs (telaprevir and boceprevir) to antivirals already in use for hepatitis C (pegylated interferon and ribavirin). Together, the formula increases the cure rate from 40-50% to 70-80% and shortens the treatment time by half.

Robert S. Brown, Jr., MD, MPH

Robert S. Brown, Jr., MD, MPH

Join us November 14th at 1:00 PM/ET on Columbia Surgery Blog Talk Radio to chat with Hepatologist Elizabeth Verna, MD, MS, Assistant Professor of Medicine at NYP/Columbia’s Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation and Robert S. Brown Jr., MD, MPH, Director of the Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation. Speak to our expert about these new and exciting treatment options and learn more about Hepatitis C and the triple viral therapy medications. Dr. Verna will answer your questions live, such as:

      • Who would be a good candidate for this new treatment?
      • How does the triple viral therapy medications work together to better target the Hepatitis C infection?
      • What is triple viral therapy’s role in liver transplantation?

To submit a question for our doctors before the show, visit our question submission form or tweet an “@” reply to @columbiasurgery.

Then on November 14th at 1:00 PM/ET log into Columbia Surgery Blog Talk Radio Channel to listen to the show. If you’d like to speak to Dr. Verna and Dr. Brown live, call 347-539-5189 while we are on the air.

Listen to internet radio with ColumbiaSurgery on Blog Talk Radio

Related Link:
New Hepatitis C Treatments Blog Talk Radio Program Transcript

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New Cocktail Boosts Recovery from Hepatitis C

June 30, 2012

TweetFor someone with liver disease, a cocktail is normally a forbidden luxury. But in some cases, it may be just what the doctor ordered. Two recently approved medications are now being combined with traditional treatments to form a powerful new drug cocktail, improving the outcomes among patients with this challenging disease. The new cocktail, part […]

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Reflections of a Living Liver Donor

April 30, 2012

TweetIn July 2009, I was a liver donor to my 21 year old daughter, Jen, whose liver failed due to autoimmune hepatitis. I first wrote about the experience in December 2009. Though I accurately captured the emotion and the gratitude I felt at the time, I glossed over many aspects of the journey. Our lives […]

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The Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation Announces New Appointments

January 20, 2012

TweetNewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has a distinguished track record for liver transplantation and features a team of world renowned leaders in the field. The Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation offers a seamless integration of medical, surgical, radiological, and support services — using both deceased and living donor liver tissue, and minimally invasive laparoscopic techniques whenever possible. […]

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Challenges in Liver Transplantation: Allocation of Donor Organs

November 16, 2011

TweetThe November 10, 2011 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine features an editorial by Robert S. Brown, Jr., MD, MPH, Director of the Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation, titled Transplantation for Alcoholic Hepatitis — Time to Rethink the 6-Month “Rule.” In this editorial, Dr. Brown addresses the difficult questions surrounding how to […]

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All in the Family: Woman Donates Left Lobe of Liver to Her Fiancé

November 9, 2011

TweetWhen Megan Ellerd and Steven Ferretti met seven years ago, it was “instant love,” she says. Not long after, the young couple found out that Steven had autoimmune hepatitis — but they didn’t worry too much about it, hoping that it wouldn’t affect them until much later in life. In 2008, however, the two were […]

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